How to Make Dulce de Leche Frappe

The Cafe Frappé originated in Greece and was made with instant coffee. The Dulce de Leche Frappé features a caramel syrup from Argentina, and this frozen treat has since evolved from its origins in Greece to give you an afternoon shot of espresso. The 10% cream and caramel syrup make this delicious drink a must have at pool parties.

What you need for a Dulce de Leche Frappé:

  • One cup of 10% cream or vanilla ice cream
  • half cup dulce de leche syrup
  • Two shots espresso (2 fluid oz)
  • Three cups ice

Directions

  1. Scoop two tablespoons of dulce de leche from the half cup and set aside
  2. Add espresso, cream, and ice to a blender, pulse until smooth
  3. Spoon into glasses
  4. Drizzle remaining dulce de leche on top of the frappe
  5. Serve immediately

The espresso for this drink should be made fresh. Alternatively, you can make a cold brew coffee to keep in the fridge and make Frappé all week long! To make a cold brew; use cold filtered water in a four to one ratio with coarsely ground coffee. Place in a french press and ensure the coffee is fully saturated with the cold water. Cover the french press with foil or saran wrap and place in the fridge for twelve to fourteen hours. When it’s ready, use the plunger and substitute the cold brew for the espresso in this recipe.

To get the most flavor out of your coffee prepare the ice cubes with filtered water. When it comes to tap water versus filtered water for your coffee, filtered is best especially when you consider 99% of coffee is water. Filtered water will have a bright and crisp flavor to it, removing any after taste of metallic or acidity you can find with some tap waters. When making a frappé, it is easy to overlook the type of water used in your icecube tray, avoid this rookie frappé mistake by always using filtered water.

For the Dulce de Leche Frappé, cream or vanilla ice cream will create a creamier more decadent drink, but if you are calorie and/or dairy conscious a substitute like skim milk or cashew milk works well. If you are a fan of coffee syrups, you may already have butterscotch on your shelf. Butterscotch works well as a substitute for the dulce de leche. It has a brown sugar and buttery base with caramelized notes that add depth to the syrup in a way that is similar to dulce de leche.